3 Easy Strawberry Face Mask Recipes to Make at Home – Telegraph

Coupled with lemon juice, this mask removes excess sebum on the skin's surface and cleanses skin pores from deep within. Lemon juice is a natural astringent and also helps fade acne scars and dark spots. The alpha hydroxyl acids in strawberries helps control oil production on the skin surface, keeping pimples and blackheads away.

Check out the benefits of the additional ingredient, lemon, in this face mask:

Keep These Diet-Busting Ingredients Out of Your Smoothie If You Want to Lose Weight – Telegraph

If weight loss is on your list of New Year's resolutions, you'll soon be putting together a healthy meal plan (let's just enjoy the holidays first, OK?), and no doubt there will be a few smoothies thrown in there. Smoothies are a great option for a healthy breakfast or snack because they are easy and quick and you can pack a lot of nutrition into just one glass.

Smoothies can quickly turn into dessert (and I don't mean this healthy blueberry cheesecake smoothie), though, if you aren't careful about what (and how much) you throw into your blender.

We spoke with holistic nutrition consultant Julia Visser to find out which foods to keep out of your smoothie if you're trying to keep it weight-loss friendly.

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Chocolate Chips

We'd all love for our smoothies to taste just like a chocolate milkshake, but if you go this route, the calories and sugar can add up fast. One-quarter cup of semisweet chocolate chips will add 280 calories and 32 grams of sugar to your smoothie! You can slash major calories and all of the sugar by subbing cacao nibs or unsweetened cocoa powder instead. If you can't resist that chocolate milkshake, try this vegan chocolate milkshake smoothie instead.

Honey

Just because Winnie the Pooh can survive off honey doesn't mean that you can (not that we don't love his little bear belly). Lots of smoothie recipes include honey (or other liquid sweeteners), but they aren't necessary. Just a few tablespoons of honey can add almost 200 calories to your smoothie. Fruit is plenty sweet on its own, so there's really no reason to add extra sweeteners on top of it. Visser also suggests using spices like cinnamon and vanilla to "give a smoothie plenty of sweetness without the added sugar." This almond strawberry-banana yogurt smoothie is sweet as can be, with no added sugar in sight.

Too Much Nut Butter

We are big (OK, huge) fans of peanut butter, but you've got to keep the spoonfuls in check if weight loss is your goal. Visser says, "Nut butters are great for satiety, which can actually help with weight loss." A tablespoon of peanut butter carries about 100 calories, and that is just for the no-sugar-added varieties. We won't deny you if banana and peanut butter is your thing, but it's best to measure out the nut butter until you've done it enough times to easily eyeball it.

Fruit-Flavored Yogurt

Yogurt gives smoothies their, well, smooth texture, and avoiding the fruit-flavored varieties is "key to avoiding too much sugar," according to Visser. An eight-ounce container of plain, nonfat Chobani yogurt has only four grams of sugar, but if you opt for the Banana Fruit on the Bottom instead, you'll be getting 14 grams. That may not seem like a big difference, but it adds up. If you want to get that sweet fruit flavor, stick with real fruit so you can get some fiber. Here are a few yogurt-powered smoothies to get you started.

So, what's your favorite healthy smoothie ingredient?

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Cera Hensley

Scientists Find 'Good' Cholesterol Can Sometimes Be Bad – Telegraph

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So-called "good" cholesterol may actually increase heart attack risks in some people, researchers said on Thursday, a discovery that casts fresh doubt on drugs designed to raise it.

High density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is generally associated with reduced heart risks, since it usually offsets the artery-clogging effects of the low density (LDL) form.

But some people have a rare genetic mutation that causes the body to have high levels of HDL and this group, paradoxically, has a higher heart risk, scientists reported in the journal Science.

"Our results indicate that some causes of raised HDL actually increase risk for heart disease," said lead researcher Daniel Rader of the University of Pennsylvania. "This is the first demonstration of a genetic mutation that raises HDL but increases risk of heart disease."

The scientists found that people with the mutation had an increased relative risk of coronary heart disease almost equivalent to the risk caused by smoking. Normally, HDL is an important helper in the smooth running of the cardiovascular system by ferrying cholesterol to the liver, where it is eliminated.

But this process is disrupted in people with a faulty version of a gene known as SCARB1, leading to high levels of HDL that fails to do its job, Rader and colleagues found. The mutation appears to be specific to people of Ashkenazi Jewish descent.

The finding could help explain why drugs that boost HDL have so far failed to deliver expected benefits in clinical trials. Over the past decade, three experimental drugs known as CETP inhibitors from Pfizer, Roche and Eli Lilly have flopped in tests, leaving Merck's anacetrapib as the only one remaining in late-stage studies.

Peter Weissberg, medical director at the British Heart Foundation, which supported the research, said the new research had shed light on a major puzzle and could open up new medical avenues in the longer term.

"These unexpected findings pave the way for further research into the SCARB1 pathway to identify new treatments to reduce heart attacks in the future," he said in a statement.